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Cadet Study Guide

EAST VALLEY HIGH SCHOOL – JROTC  STUDY GUIDE (Page 1)

THE MISSION OF JROTC:
“TO MOTIVATE YOUNG PEOPLE TO BE BETTER CITIZENS”

CHAIN OF COMMAND

*Commander-In-Chief

President Donald J. Trump

*Secretary of Defense

Honorable Patrick M. Shanahan

* Secretary of the Army

Honorable Mark T. Esper

Chief of Staff of the Army

General Mark A. Milley

Commander of TRADOC

General Stephen J. Townsend

Commander of Cadet Command

Major General John R. Evans Jr.

Commander, 8th Brigade

Colonel Vanessa Y. Moye

Senior Army Instructor

Captain Arnold K. Jacobsen

East Valley JROTC Battalion Commander

CDT/MAJ Logan J. Dukes

*Denotes these positions are civilian positions. The Chain Of Command above begins with the President, the highest position in the Chain Of Command and continues to your Squad Leader, the lowest position in the Chain Of Command. You should always begin to use the Chain Of Command starting with the lowest position and working up. 

 

KEY PERSONNEL

 

The following personnel ARE NOT in the Chain-Of-Command, however, you should know these people because of the positions they hold.  You should also know what the Battalion Command and Staff are responsible for as indicated by the parenthesis beside their title /position.

 

Vice President of the U.S

Honorable Michael R. Pence

Secretary of  State(U.S.)

Honorable Michael R. Pompeo

Director of  JROTC, Cadet Command

Colonel Michael A. Stinnett

Governor of Washington

Honorable Jay R. Inslee

Senior Senator from Washington

Honorable Patricia L. Murray

Junior Senator from Washington

Honorable Maria E. Cantwell

4th District Congressman

Honorable Dan Newhouse

Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff

General Joseph F. Dunford Jr.

Sergeant Major of the Army

SMA Daniel A. Dailey

Principal of East Valley High School

Mrs. Kayla Crowe

Army Instructor- East Valley HS JROTC 

SFC Charles T. Waggoner

Cadet Battalion Executive Officer

CDT/1LT Katie L. Crane

Cadet Battalion Command Sergeant Major

CDT/CSM Isaiah M. Salinas

Cadet Battalion S-1 Officer (Personnel and Admin)

CDT/2LT Levi Hengeveld

Cadet Battalion S-2 Officer (Security and Intelligence)

CDT/2LT Rhiannon S. Jacobsen

Cadet Battalion S-3 Officer (Operations and Training)

CDT/2LT Toby Zigan

Cadet Battalion S-4 Officer (Supply and Maintenance)

CDT/SFC Alexander Jolley

Cadet Battalion S-5 Officer (Special Projects)

CDT/2LT Camille M. Anderson

Cadet Battalion S-9 Officer (Public Affairs)

CDT/2LT Maya Vargas

Cadet Battalion Alpha Company Commander

CDT/2LT Alex Calhoun

 

PHONETIC ALPHABET

Cadets should be able to use the following phonetic pronunciations of the alphabet to spell words.  Example:  CAT spelled phonetically is Charlie, Alpha, Tango.

A – ALPHA

G – GOLF

M – MIKE

R – ROMEO

X – X-RAY

B – BRAVO 

H – HOTEL

N – NOVEMBER

S – SIERRA

Y – YANKEE

C – CHARLIE

I – INDIA

O – OSCAR

T – TANGO

Z – ZULU

D – DELTA

J – JULIET

P – PAPA

U – UNIFORM

 

E – ECHO

K – KILO

*Q – QUEBEC

V – VICTOR

 

F – FOXTROT

L – LIMA

*(pronounced-KEY BECK)

W – WHISKEY

 

 

EAST VALLEY HIGH SCHOOL – JROTC STUDY GUIDE (Page 2)

RANK AND INSIGNIA IDENTIFICATION

There are three types of rank within the Army: Commissioned Officers, Warrant Officers, and Enlisted personnel. Within the Cadet Corps there are only officers and enlisted personnel, but no Warrant Officers, nor are there any cadets above the rank of Cadet Colonel. Rank is a person’s designation or title they are called.  Insignia is what they wear to identify their rank. The appropriate abbreviation for each rank is in parentheses beside the appropriate rank. Those abbreviations are correct for officers in the Army or Cadets. Cadet Officers and enlisted personnel should put the abbreviation “CDT” before their rank for proper identification, or simply "C" with a forward slash. (Example:  A Cadet Lieutenant Colonel, when writing their rank would write, CDT LTC or C/LTC, a Cadet Staff Sergeant would write CDT SSG or C/SSG).   

GENERAL OFFICER RANK AND INSIGNIA   

JROTC Cadets

 
General (GEN) Four silver stars  Not applicable
Lieutenant General (LTG) Three silver stars Not applicable
Major General (MG) Two silver stars Not applicable
Brigadier General (BG) One silver star Not applicable

 

FIELD OFFICER RANK
Colonel (COL)  One silver eagle   Three silver diamonds
Lieutenant Colonel (LTC)  One silver oak leaf Two silver diamonds
Major (MAJ) One gold oak leaf  One silver diamond
COMPANY OFFICER RANK
Captain (CPT)  Two silver bars Three silver disks
First Lieutenant (1LT)   One silver bar Two silver disks
Second Lieutenant (2LT) One gold bar  One silver disk
 
(Remember SSG when you think of the Officer Ranks, Silver Silver Gold)
 
        
ENLISTED RANK    JROTC Cadets
Sergeant Major of the Army (SMA) Three stripes, three rockers with two stars in the middle Not applicable
Command Sergeant Major (CSM) Three stripes, three rockers, star in the middle with a wreath around the star See below
Sergeant Major (SGM) Three stripes, three rockers with a star in the middle See below
First Sergeant (1SG) Three stripes, three rockers with a diamond in the middle  See below
Master Sergeant (MSG) Three stripes, three rockers See below
Sergeant First Class (SFC) Three stripes, two rockers  See below
Staff Sergeant (SSG) Three stripes, one rocker See below
Sergeant (SGT) Three stripes See below
Corporal (CPL) Two stripes See below
Private First Class (PFC) One stripe, one rocker See below
Private Two (PV2) One stripe See below
Private One (PV1) No insignia to wear 
Not applicable

that the Army rank is exactly the same as cadet rank except where the Army enlisted person has rockers, cadets have bars.  (Example: A Cadet Sergeant First Class would identify their rank as three stripes and two bars).

EAST VALLEY HIGH SCHOOL – JROTC STUDY GUIDE , PAGE 3

FIRST AID

The four life-saving steps are: 1 – Clear the airway, 2 – Stop the bleeding, 3 – Treat/Control shock, 4 – Dress all wounds and splint all fractures. 

The ABC’s of CPR are: Airway, Breathing, and Circulation. There are two types of fractures, 1 – Open or (Compound - the bone has broken through the skin), and 2 – Closed or (Simple - the bone has not broken the skin).

The minimum number of ties you must use when splinting a fracture is four: Top, Bottom, Top, Bottom. 

There are three types of bleeding (in order of severity), 1 – Arterial (bright-red spurting blood), 2 – Venous (dark-red oozing blood),   3 – Capillary (bright-red oozing blood). 

The preferred method of stopping the bleeding is direct pressure and elevation.

 

MAP READING

You read a military topographic map right and up.  There are three types of north; 1 – Magnetic, 2 – True, and 3 – Grid.  There are five primary colors on a military map; 1 – Black (Man-made objects), 2 – Blue (Water), 3 – Green (Vegetation), 4 – Red (Primary highways), 5 – Brown (Contour lines and lines of elevation). 

Four digit grid coordinates place you with 1000 meters of the target, six digit grid coordinates place you within 100 meters of the target, eight digit grid coordinates place you with 10 meters of the target. 

The letters which are at the bottom of the military map and which should always be part of any written grid coordinates is called the 100,000 meter square identifier. 

 

THE CADET CREED

I AM AN ARMY JUNIOR ROTC CADET.

I WILL ALWAYS CONDUCT MYSELF TO BRING CREDIT TO MY FAMILY, COUNTRY, SCHOOL AND THE CORPS OF CADETS.

I AM LOYAL AND PATRIOTIC.  I AM THE FUTURE OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

I DO NOT LIE, CHEAT OR STEAL AND WILL ALWAYS BE ACCOUNTABLE FOR MY ACTIONS AND DEEDS.

I WILL ALWAYS PRACTICE GOOD CITIZENSHIP AND PATRIOTISM.

I WILL WORK HARD TO IMPROVE MY MIND AND STRENGTHEN MY BODY.

I WILL SEEK THE MANTLE OF LEADERSHIP AND STAND PREPARED TO UPHOLD THE CONSTITUTION AND THE AMERICAN WAY OF LIFE.

MAY GOD GRANT ME THE STRENGTH TO ALWAYS LIVE BY THIS CREED.

 

GENERAL INFORMATION

There are three basic leadership styles; 1 – Directing, 2 – Participating, 3 – Delegating. 

The four individual values all leaders and followers must possess are; 1 – Courage, 2 – Candor,   3 – Competence, and 4 – Commitment. 

A leader must also employ ethics which are the principles or standards that guide us to do the moral or right thing. 

There are four categories of awards a Cadet may receive: 1 – Academic, 2 – Athletic, 3 – Military, and 4 – Miscellaneous. 

When entering a military vehicle, the junior person always enters the vehicle first.  When walking with someone that is higher rank than you, you should always walk to that person’s left.  The person walking on your right is occupying the position of honor. 

Think “L-D-R-S-H-I-P” The seven Army Values are, 1 – Loyalty; 2 – Duty, 3 – Respect; 4 – Selfless Service; 5 – Honor; 6 – Integrity; 7 – Personal Courage

The colors/personalities/animals involved with “Winning Colors” are Green/Planner/Fox; Blue/Relater/Dolphin; Brown/Builder/Bull/Bear; Red/Adventurer/Tiger. 

 

 SEVEN LEADERSHIP SKILLS

Cooperation, Patience, Fairness, Mutual Respect, Strength, Self Improvement, and Balance.

General Orders

1st General Order: I will guard every thing within the limits of my post and quit my post only when properly relieved.

2nd General Order: I will obey my special orders and perform all my duties in a military manner.

3rd General Order: I will report all violations of my special orders, emergencies, and anything not covered in my instructions to the Commander of the relief.

 

The 11 Principles of Leadership

1.  Know yourself and seek improvement.   7. Train your subordinates as a team
2. Be technically and tactically proficient.  8. Make sound and timely decisions.
3. Know your subordinates and look out for their welfare.  9. Develop a sense of responsibility among your subordinates.
4. Keep your subordinates informed. 10. Employ your command in accordance with its capabilities.
5. Set the example.    11. Seek responsibility and takes responsibility for your actions.
6. Ensure the task is understood, supervised, and accomplished.